Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Studio Session w/ Hip Hop MC Mr Keith Murray




















Keith Murray is an American rapper and a member of the hip hop trio Def Squad, which includes fellow rappers Redman and Erick Sermon.

Before Murray ever recorded an album, he battled Big Daddy Kane under the name MC Do Damage. Later, he was introduced to Erick Sermon of EPMD by K-Solo. Sermon included Murray on his album No Pressure on the single "Hostile". His first album, The Most Beautifullest Thing in This World, was released in 1994 on Jive Records. The title track from this album remains Murray's biggest solo hit. This album was given 4 mics by The Source. Murray continued to enjoy a high media-profile by appearing on a Coca-Cola advertisement and guesting on remixes of Mary J. Blige’s ‘Be Happy’, Total’s ‘Can’t You See’ and LL Cool J.’s ‘I Shot Ya’.

Monday, January 20, 2014

Shocase is back with another blend. This time we bring Dave Kelly's Eighty Five Riddim vs Lorde's - Royals. This is a Dj Shocase Reggae Blend. 




Ella Maria Lani Yelich-O'Connor (born 7 November 1996), known by her stage name Lorde (/ˈlɔrd/), is a New Zealand singer-songwriter. Born and raised in Devonport, Auckland, she performed in various singing and drama classes as a child, and at the age of thirteen signed with Universal. Yelich-O'Connor adopted her stage name due to her fascination with "royals and aristocracy", but felt the name Lord was too masculine so added an 'e' to make it more feminine.

Dj Shocase: @IamDjShocase

www.djshocase.com
www.facebook.com/DjShocase
www.twitter.com/IamDjShocase
www.youtube.com/IamDjShocase
www.mixcloud.com/IamDjShocase
www.basicimagehd.com

Monday, December 30, 2013

Basic Image Sound Presents: Sound System and Video Screen Set Up.


Check out this video we made while setting up for an event. We brought out some LCD's, a Projector and some Up Lighting. Get in contact with us for you next event!

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Surrounded By Two Legends (Dj Jazzy Jay and The Grandwizard Theodore)

Dj Jazzy Jay, Shocase  & The Grand Wizard Theodore

Jazzy Jay was born into a Gullah family in coastal South Carolina. He moved with his family to New York City at a young age and took up the drums, his first instrument. He began his career in hip hop in the 1970s in The Bronx, New York, the epicenter of hip hop culture during the first decade of its development, at the age of 13. An early member of Afrika Bambaataa's Universal Zulu Nation, he was a protégé of Bambaataa as well as his older cousin, Kool DJ Red Alert. Beginning as a Zulu King dancer in the early 1970s, Jay later became a Universal Zulu Nation DJ and was a member of the Zulu group Jazzy Five, with which he recorded the single "Jazzy Sensation."
Although Jazzy Jay began performing primarily at street parties, in the 1980s he began DJing in New York clubs such as Negril, the Roxy, the Ritz, and Danceteria. He also hosted a hip hop radio program on KISS FM and in 1984 he played himself as The Roxy's DJ in the influential hip hop film Beat Street.
Jazzy Jay and Afrika Islam performed some of the first DJ team routines, and teamed up to battle both Grandmaster Flash (solo) and Grand Wizard Theodore (solo).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Wizard_Theodore
Grand Wizzard Theodore (born March 5, 1963) is an American hip hop DJ. He is widely credited as the inventor of scratching.[1][2]
Born Theodore Livingston in Bronx, New York, Theodore's brother, Mean Gene, was his mentor, and began to teach him the technique of DJing during his childhood years. In addition to scratching, he achieved renown for his mastery of needle drops and other techniques which he invented or perfected. Theodore also apprenticed under Grandmaster Flash.[2]
Though variants of the story exist, it is generally accepted that Grand Wizard Theodore was playing records at a high volume in his bedroom. Fed up with the noise his mother entered and ordered him to turn the music down. At this point he looked away from the turntable to face her. While his mother lectured him he continued slowly moving the record back and forth, which produced a sound all its own. When she left the room he was intrigued by the sound the vinyl made when manipulated in this fashion. After months of experimentation he introduced this technique at a party and thus the scratch was born. Every form of popular music has at one time or another used the scratching sound in a composition. It is not uncommon to hear the technique used to this day in a wide variety of genres.
In the early 1980s, Theodore was a part of the group Grandwizard Theodore & the Fantastic Five. They released "Can I Get a Soul Clap" in 1980. He was also featured in the 1983 film Wild Style, as well as contributing to the film's soundtrack. He explains the origin of the scratch in the documentary, Scratch.[2]
Theodore's phrase "Say turn it up" from his track "Fantastic Freaks at the Dixie" was sampled by hip hop and rap acts such as Public Enemy (on the track "Bring the Noise"), Bomb the Bass (on the track "Megablast") and many others.